Publications & Outputs

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Peer-reviewed journal articles

Snell, Julia & Ian Cushing. (under review). “A lot of them write how they speak”: Policy, pedagogy, and the policing of ‘nonstandard’ English. Special issue of Literacy on ‘Oracy and education: Shifting perspectives and policy tensions’.

Cushing, Ian and Julia Snell (2022). The (white) ears of Ofsted: a raciolinguistic perspective on the listening practices of the schools inspectorate. Language in Society.

Snell, Julia. (2018). Solidarity, Stance and Class Identities. Language in Society 47(5). [Link to article. See here for pre-publication copy]

Snell, Julia. (2018). Critical reflections on the role of the sociolinguist in UK language debates . Language in Society. 47(3): 368-374. [Link to article. See here for pre-publication copy]

Snell, Julia & Adam Lefstein. (2018). “Low Ability”, participation and identity in dialogic pedagogy. American Educational Research Journal. 55(1): 40-78. [Link to article. See here for pre-publication copy]

Segal, Aliza, Julia Snell and Adam Lefstein (2017). Dialogic teaching to the high-stakes standardised test? Research Papers in Education. 32(5): 596-610 [Link to article. See here for pre-publication copy]

Snell, Julia and Richard Andrews (2016). To what extent does a regional dialect and accent impact on the development of reading and writing skills? Cambridge Journal of Education 47(3): 297-313.[Link to article. See here for pre-publication copy]

Lefstein, Adam, Julia Snell and Mirit Israeli. (2015). From Moves to Sequences: Expanding the Unit of Analysis in the Study of Classroom Discourse. British Educational Research Journal. [Link to article. See here for pre-publication copy]

Snell, Julia. (2014). Social Class and Language. In Jan-Ola Östman and Jef Verschueren (Eds). Handbook of Pragmatics: 2014 Installment. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. [Link to article. See here for pre-publication copy]

Snell, Julia. (2013). Dialect, Interaction and Class Positioning at School: From Deficit to Difference to Repertoire. Language and Education 27(2): 110-128. [Link to article. See here for pre-publication copy]

Lefstein, A. & J. Snell (2013). Beyond a Unitary Conception of Pedagogic Pace: Quantitative Measurement and Ethnographic Experience. British Educational Research Journal. 39(1): 73–106. [Link to article]

Snell, Julia (2011). Interrogating video-data: Systematic quantitative analysis versus micro-ethnographic analysis. In Carey Jewitt (ed.) Video Based Social Research: Theory And PracticeSpecial issue of the International Journal of Social Research Methodology 14(3). [Link to article]

Lefstein, Adam & Julia Snell (2011a). Promises and problems of teaching with popular culture: A linguistic ethnographic analysis of discourse genre mixing. Reading Research Quarterly 46(1): 40-69. [Link to article]

Lefstein, Adam & Julia Snell (2011b). Professional vision and the politics of teacher learning. Teaching and Teacher Education 27(3): 505-514. [Link to article]

Snell, Julia. (2010). From sociolinguistic variation to socially strategic stylisation. Journal of Sociolinguistics 14(5): 618-644. [Link to article. See here for pre-publication copy].

Snell, Julia. (2006). Schema theory and the humour of Little Britain. English Today 22(1): 59-64.

Books

Snell, Julia, Sara Shaw & Fiona Copland (eds.) ( 2015 ). Linguistic Ethnography: Interdisciplinary Explorations. London: Palgrave.

Lefstein, Adam & Julia Snell (2014). Better than Best practice: Developing teaching and learning through dialogue. London: Routledge. [Visit our website for more detail: www.dialogicpedagogy.com. Reviews of the book can be found here]

Other Publications

Cushing, Ian and Julia Snell (accepted). Prescriptivism in education: From language ideologies to listening practices. In J. Beal, M. Lukač & R. Straaijer (eds). The Routledge Handbook of Linguistic Prescriptivism.

Snell, Julia. (submitted). Social class and educational inequalities. In Emma Moore and Chris Montgomery (eds). The Oxford Handbook of British Englishes.

Snell, Julia. (submitted). Non-standard English and Education. In S. Fox (ed). Language in the British Isles (3rd edn.). Cambridge: CUP.

Snell, Julia. (2019). Evidence submitted to the Oracy APPG Speak for Change Inquiry.

Snell, Julia. (2019). Social Class. In Karin Tusting (ed.). The Routledge Handbook of Linguistic Ethnography. London: Routledge. [See here for pre-pub copy].

Snell, Julia. (2017). Enregisterment, indexicality and the social meaning of ‘howay’: dialect and identity in north-east England. In Emma Moore and Chris Montgomery (Eds). Language and a Sense of Place. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [See here for pre-publication copy]

Snell, Julia. (2015). Linguistic ethnographic perspectives on working-class children’s speech: challenging discourses of deficit. In J. Snell, J., F. Copland, & S. Shaw (eds). Linguistic Ethnography: Interdisciplinary Explorations. London: Palgrave, 225-245. [See here for pre-publication copy]

Snell, Julia & Adam Lefstein (2015). Moving from “interesting data” to “publishable research article” – some interpretative and representational dilemmas. In P. Smeyers, D. Bridges, N. Burbules & M. Griffiths. (eds.). International Handbook of Interpretation in Educational Research Methods. Springer. [See here for pre-publication version]

Snell, Julia & Adam Lefstein. (2011). Computer-assisted systematic observation of classroom discourse and interaction. Working Papers in Urban Language and Literacies 77. King’s College London. [Download PDF]

Snell, Julia & Adam Lefstein. (2012). Interpretative & representational dilemmas in a linguistic ethnographic analysis: Moving from ‘interesting data’ to a publishable research article. Working Papers in Urban Language and Literacies 90. King’s College London. [Download PDF]

Lefstein, Adam & Julia Snell. (2011c). Classroom discourse: The promise and complexity of dialogic practice. In Sue Ellis & Elspeth McCartney (eds). Applied Linguistics and Primary School Teaching.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,  165-185. [Pre-publication version here]

Moore, Emma & Julia Snell. (2011). “Oh, they’re top, them”: Right dislocated tags & interactional stance. Language Variation: European Perspectives III. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 97-110. [Download PDF]

Snell, Julia & Adam Lefstein. (2011). Promises and Perils of Video-based Teacher Professional Development. Final report on project funded by the Centre for Work-Based Learning for Educational Professionals, a HEFCE-funded initiative to encourage excellence and innovation in Education. [Download PDF]

Snell, Julia. (2010). ‘Yeah but no but yeah’: A linguistic perspective on the humour of Little Britain. In Sharon Lockyer (ed). Reading Little Britain. London: I.B. Tauris, 53-71. [Pre-publication version here]